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How to Encrypt your Maven password

Although Maven documentation has a whole page on their password encryption feature, it doesn’t actually tell you how to do what you need to do to encrypt Maven passwords.

What am I talking about?
If you have authentication to Maven repos in your organization, you normally store the username and password in the Maven settings file located by default at ~/.m2/settings.xml.

For example, I might have something like this in my settings.xml . . .

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The cloud is just other people’s computers

When you read the word “cloud” you should just mentally strike it out and insert “other people’s computers.” For example, AWS has a page titled, What is cloud computing? with the following definition:

Cloud computing is the on-demand delivery of compute power, database storage, applications, and other IT resources through a cloud services platform via the internet with pay-as-you-go pricing.

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This should be rewritten as:

Cloud computing is the on-demand delivery of compute power, database storage, applications, and other IT resources through a cloud services platform other people’s computers via the internet with pay-as-you-go pricing.

The value of the “cloud” doesn’t come out of the idea of using other people’s computers, though. The real value is from the tooling built into a given cloud platform. We don’t get much benefit just from using other people’s computers. But if we can use other people’s computers only when we need them, that’s valuable. That’s how a company can meet demand elastically. It’s how they can keep their site up for all the shoppers on Black Friday without spending millions the rest of the year for infrastructure that is sitting idle.

Developing on Mac

Apple's Mac makes a fine development computer but it takes a bit of adjustment for a PC user
Apple’s Mac makes a fine development computer but it takes a bit of adjustment for a PC user

I’ve made a job switch and at the new job I’ve started using a Mac to develop. I used to do a lot of audio engineering on Macs, about seven to ten years ago. Then a thief smashed my truck window and stole my Macbook Pro with nearly $2000 of audio software on it for an over $4000 loss overall. (Never leave your Mac in a parked vehicle, even for “just a minute” while you “run inside and grab something.”) Since then I haven’t used Macs much, although my wife has one that she uses for her photography business.

The point is I’m not new to Macs. Continue reading “Developing on Mac”