How to slow down and go faster

In my previous article please don’t organize for speed, I shared this paradoxical quote from Cisco’s Scott Cherf:

To go faster, slow down. Everybody who knows about orbital mechanics understands that.

Say what? Slow down to go faster?
What do you think Cherf is talking about? Not rushing? That’s probably most people’s first thought. I bet most of us have had the experience of rushing to get a task done and screwing something up in a way that makes us have to go back and do the work over.

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Another possibility is that he means we should follow a plan . . . (read more)

Why I defactor as much as I refactor

What is defactoring?

Defactoring is actually refactoring, but it looks and feels wrong because it seems like reverse refactoring. Defactoring is refactoring code toward a seemingly worse state, such as one with duplicate code and code that has moved from higher to lower level abstractions. I once shied away from defactoring, feeling like I must be committing some crime, but now I embrace it, under certain circumstances.

A description of how an apple grows from a flower. From Hilgard, E. W. and W. J. V. Osterhout Agriculture for Schools of the Pacific Slope (New York, NY: The MacMillian Company, 1910)
A description of how an apple grows from a flower. From Hilgard, E. W. and W. J. V. Osterhout Agriculture for Schools of the Pacific Slope (New York, NY: The MacMillian Company, 1910)

Why would I want to defactor?

One reason to defactor code is . . .

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How to Encrypt your Maven password

Although Maven documentation has a whole page on their password encryption feature, it doesn’t actually tell you how to do what you need to do to encrypt Maven passwords.

What am I talking about?
If you have authentication to Maven repos in your organization, you normally store the username and password in the Maven settings file located by default at ~/.m2/settings.xml.

For example, I might have something like this in my settings.xml . . .